Object Timeline

1953

  • Work on this object began.

1954

  • Work on this object ended.

1962

  • We acquired this object.

1991

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Drawing, Proposed Cottage for Kirk Wilkinson, Wellfleet, MA

This is a Drawing. It was designed by Serge Ivan Chermayeff. We acquired it in 1962. Its medium is brown felt tip pen, chalk, graphite on yellow tracing paper. It is a part of the Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design department.

Chermayeff calls attention to the cross-braced framing of his modernist Cape Cod cottage by rendering the resulting triangular sections in clear, primary colors. This strategy also breaks up the 56-foot-long façade into small, playful shapes—essentially the logic of disruptive patterning, or camouflage.

This object was donated by Serge Ivan Chermayeff.

Our curators have highlighted 6 objects that are related to this one. Here are three of them, selected at random:

Cite this object as

Drawing, Proposed Cottage for Kirk Wilkinson, Wellfleet, MA; Designed by Serge Ivan Chermayeff (American, b. Grozny, Chechnya 1900–1996); USA; brown felt tip pen, chalk, graphite on yellow tracing paper; 1962-45-6

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibitions Saturated: The Allure and Science of Color and The Cooper-Hewitt Collections: A Design Resource.

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18444283/ |title=Drawing, Proposed Cottage for Kirk Wilkinson, Wellfleet, MA |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=13 November 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>