Please don't steal our images, yeah?


What is this?

Length of metallic silver and black fabric with a variably puckered surface that resembles the skin of a crocodile.

Why is this in our collection?

Crocodile represents junichi Arai’s experimentation with the material polyphenylene sulfide, a highly flame-resistant cloth. The textile is composed of not only PPS, but also wool, and the surface texture, which looks similar to the skin of a crocodile, is achieved by combining a melt-off technique with shibori and felting. He has been working with PPS for almost twenty years, but it was only in 2004 that he completed his experimentation and filed for a patent, however, the stainless steel color of PPS in Crocodile was developed in 2006. 

This is a textile from Japan. It is dated 2007 and we acquired it in 2007. Museum purchase from General Acquisitions Endowment Fund. This object is currently resting in our storage facility ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ

Its medium is

medium: pps (polyphenylene sulfide), wool technique: melt-off, shibori-dyed, and felted

Its dimensions are

H x W: 480.1 x 98.4 cm (15 ft. 9 in. x 38 3/4 in.)

This object was designed by Junichi Arai

This object was fund: General Acquisitions Endowment and purchased from Gallery Gen

See more stuff from the Textiles department.

Do you have your own photos of this object? Are they online somewhere, like Flickr or Instagram? Or have you created a 3D model of one of our objects in SketchUp or Thingiverse? If so then then tag them with ch:object=18711335 and we will connect ours to yours!

If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=http://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18711335/ |title=Textile, "Crocodile", 2007 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=30 July 2014 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>

If you would like to tell us more about an object or have found an error in an object record, please fill out this form. Objects that are slated to be on display when the museum re-opens in 2014 are being given priority but all corrections are welcomed!