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2012

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2018

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Shareway 2030 Concept, 2012

This is a Shareway 2030 Concept. It was designed by Höweler + Yoon. It is dated 2012.

This design concept proposes a new American dream, trading ownership for sharing, where freedom and opportunity derived from access, density, proximity, and seamless mobility can restructure the American city and surrounding region. Using Boswash—the transportation corridor between Boston and Washington—as a test case, the Shareway proposes a new mobility platform for the sharing of and switching between transportation options. It enables a new linear settlement pattern no longer bound to a city’s center or sprawling periphery.

Model
2018
Wood, acrylic, paper

This model describes the Shareway an urban fabric that combines new physical infrastructure and intelligent networks. Crescents, the leftover spaces determined by Amtrak’s long curves and I-95’s undulating highway, are filled with transit-oriented, mixed-use buildings. Hubs facilitate modal switching between car, train, bike, bus, and ferry.

Video: Shareway
2012
2:25 minutes
Produced by Höweler + Yoon with Squared Design Lab (Culver City, California, USA)
Courtesy of Höweler + Yoon

It is credited Courtesy of Höweler + Yoon.

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318795861/ |title=Shareway 2030 Concept, 2012 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=22 August 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>