The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/exhibitions/874305559/

The World of Radio

The World of Radio, a batik mural dedicated to the professional career of soprano and radio star Jessica Dragonette (American, 1900–1980), is the inspiration for the display of radios, drawings, and photographs in this gallery. Spanning more than eight decades, these objects serve as a timeline of radio's development and refinement as a tool for communication and entertainment. Capping this display is the 1934 mural that celebrates Jessica Dragonette's contributions as a radio personality and includes vignettes of important milestones in radio and broadcasting history. These are illuminated against a backdrop of familiar symbols of technological advancement in the modern age. Many recognized radio's potential to facilitate long-distance communication, connect people to information, and provide entertainment. Though Guglielmo Marconi (Italian, 1874–1937) first patented his wireless telegraph system in 1896, it was decades before national radio networks emerged in the United States. When Dragonette began performing on the air for the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) in 1927, the network wasn't even a year old. The U.S. government encouraged cooperation among broadcasting, communication, and technology companies, chiefly AT&T, General Electric, Westinghouse, and Radio Corporation of America (RCA). The government support was the key to the formation of national radio networks. At around the same time, radios powered by household electrical outlets replaced those with the leaky batteries found in hobbyists garages and sheds. Radio's domestication was complete as the newest models easily harmonized with household furnishings and made listening a shared family experience. Later developments included the transistor radio in the 1950s, which replaced vacuum tubes with transistors and made radios small and portable, revolutionizing how we listen to music. Further miniaturization of components impacted the aesthetic qualities of radios while innovations such as satellite and Internet-only radio stations, apps that stream customizable music playlists, and radio programs made available as podcasts changed how we access news and entertainment. Today, radio remains relevant by expanding options that allow us to appreciate an ever-wider array of programming.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18344547/

  • graphite on white tracing paper
  • Gift of William E. Lescaze
  • architecture
  • theater
  • clock
  • CBS

Lescaze’s projects for Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) in the 1930s and 40s helped codify the company’s public identity through graphic and architectural decisions. Here Lescaze illustrates his proposal for the renovation of a midtown theater into a modern recording and performance space for CBS that would be conducive to recording while establishing a corporate identity.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18410463/

  • black and white silver gelatin print
  • Gift of Ellen Gustav Jensen
  • circular
  • radios
  • concentric
  • cabinets
  • prototype

Industrial designer Jensen’s prolific career encompassed successful patents and designs ranging from radio cabinets, like the one in the photograph, to typefaces. The striking compositions and interplay of shadows and light in these two photographs of Jensen’s designs herald modern design aesthetics and aspirations, as well as highlight the development of radio technology.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18410471/

  • black and white silver gelatin print
  • Gift of Ellen Gustav Jensen
  • graphic design
  • radios
  • technology
  • packaging

Industrial designer Jensen’s prolific career encompassed successful patents and designs ranging from radio cabinets, like the one in the photograph, to typefaces. The striking compositions and interplay of shadows and light in these two photographs of Jensen’s designs herald modern design aesthetics and aspirations, as well as highlight the development of radio technology.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18486845/

  • graphite, blue pencil on tracing paper, ruled border in graphite
  • cabinets
  • furniture design
  • domestic interior

Industrial designer Donald Deskey’s 1930s furniture designs unite form and function. Inspired by the simple sophistication of contemporary Scandinavian wooden furniture, this radio cabinet’s rectilinear shape, curved edge, and horizontal pulls allow the beauty of its materials to add interest and ornamentation. With folding doors and a sliding top, the versatile cabinet allows for easy storage and demonstrates the integration of radio technology in the furnishings of a modern home.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18621807/

  • metal, wood, molded plastic
  • Gift of Barry Friedman and Patricia Pastor
  • radios
  • rectangular
  • innovative
  • electronics

The Tischsuper RT 20 bridges the gap between early domestic audio "furniture" and the more technical aesthetic of the late twentieth century. Its rectilinear shape is emphasized by the vertical dial and the horizontal speaker slits, and its face is punctuated by minimalist knobs and gently scooped buttons that invite the user’s touch.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18621817/

  • plastic, metal
  • Gift of Barry Friedman and Patricia Pastor
  • simple
  • radios
  • rectangular
  • electronics
  • sound
  • minimal

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18621833/

  • molded plastic, metal
  • Gift of Barry Friedman and Patricia Pastor
  • personal
  • entertainment
  • music
  • simple
  • rectangular
  • portable
  • muted colors

Before radios were standard fixtures in automobile dashboards, Clairtone marketed Braun’s T 52 to the growing number of North American drivers. The versatile device served as both a tabletop and car radio: it could be propped up by its carrying handle when stationary or locked into an optional car mount when on-the-go.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18621889/

  • molded bakelite, textile (speaker cover)
  • Gift of Barry Friedman and Patricia Pastor
  • circles
  • arches
  • communication
  • radios
  • rectangular
  • listeners
  • propaganda
  • bakelite
  • dials
  • listening

These Volksempfängers, or "people’s receivers," are evidence of Hitler’s technological manipulation. Developed at the request of Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels and designed to be cheaply produced, these Bakelite-encased receivers made radio technology widely available. With tuners indicating only German and Austrian stations that broadcast Nazi propaganda, these devices played a central role in Hitler’s regime.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18621893/

  • molded bakelite, textile (speaker cover)
  • Gift of Barry Friedman and Patricia Pastor
  • communication
  • radios
  • propaganda
  • bakelite

These Volksempfängers, or "people’s receivers," are evidence of Hitler’s technological manipulation. Developed at the request of Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels and designed to be cheaply produced, these Bakelite-encased receivers made radio technology widely available. With tuners indicating only German and Austrian stations that broadcast Nazi propaganda, these devices played a central role in Hitler’s regime.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18625061/

  • graphite on tracing paper
  • domestic interiors
  • interior design
  • radios
  • cabinets

This cabinet design encases a phonograph, radio, and speakers, illustrating the centrality of radios to modern American homes. The high gloss of black lacquer and bold grain of Macassar ebony distinguish its simple forms. Deskey often used these contrasting materials, notably in a multipurpose cabinet for the "Room of the Future" at Chicago’s 1933 Century of Progress exhibition.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18626897/

  • graphite, green pencil on tracing paper
  • interior design
  • radios
  • table
  • domestic interior

Though Deskey’s radio cabinets typically hide household phonographs behind doors, this console table features the radio as decoration. An admirer of Bauhaus metal furniture, Deskey was one of the first Americans to design a line of chromium-plated steel furniture. The tubular steel echoes the radio’s material, creating a seamless chrome design highlighting new technologies.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18638239/

  • Manufactured by TACT Denki Co., Ltd.
  • molded plastic, metal, electronics
  • Gift of Arthur Lindo and Jay Loebel
  • entertainment
  • radios
  • portable
  • functional
  • red plastic
  • turntable

Japanese manufacturer TACT Denki marketed its TPR-61 phonoradio as the world’s smallest phonograph. The battery-powered device played both 33 and 45 RPM records and could also tune in to radio broadcasts. The bright, portable machine was especially popular among teenage listeners, an increasingly important demographic in the postwar period.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18639683/

  • blue, black pastel, brush and watercolor, gouache, graphite on vellum
  • Museum purchase through gift of Mrs. Griffith Bailey Coale and from Eleanor G. Hewitt Fund
  • time
  • radios
  • technology
  • presentation drawing

Arbib, who began his career styling cars for General Motors, made designs for clock radios that apply the flamboyant features of 1950s automobiles. Flaring side fins and a flashy dial approximate the look of an automotive dashboard and demonstrate how companies like General Electric eagerly added new features to radios to entice consumers.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18639691/

  • pastel, brush and gouache, pen and black ink, graphite on green paper
  • Museum purchase through the gift of Mrs. Edward C. Post
  • industrial design
  • portable
  • futuristic

While large phonograph cabinets concealed family radios, portable radios were light and flashy, attracting younger consumers eager to listen to expanded radio programming outside of the home. This design embraces futuristic and colorful style. Crosley’s radio designs favored bold colors, and this unusual cylindrical shape distinguished this portable radio from those of other low-cost competitors.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18639695/

  • pastel, some stencilled, brush and white gouache, on tracing paper
  • Museum purchase through the gift of Mrs. Edward C. Post
  • industrial design
  • radios
  • presentation drawing

The streamlined body and chrome dials of this radio show how industrial designers borrowed aspects of transportation vehicles to design futuristic-looking household products. Many presentation drawings are difficult to match to actual production units, as designs often changed in response to client wishes and production costs. This drawing very closely matches Crosley’s radio model 10-135, possibly suggesting that the designer made it for his portfolio after the radio’s production to make it appear as though he had greater influence on final production when meeting with future clients.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18642741/

  • brush and watercolor, chalk on paper
  • Gift of Alfons Bach
  • industrial design
  • dials
  • domestic interior

Bach’s presentation drawing of a radio design for Philco attracts the eye to the shining white details of the dial, speaker grill, and knobs, suggesting chrome accents. Using assembly-line manufacturing techniques, Philco made a modified version of this design in plastic; the company’s reputation for durability as well as this portable radio’s modern style attracted consumers.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18643657/

  • molded plastic, metal
  • Gift of Barbara and Max Pine
  • streamlined
  • communication
  • information
  • tool
  • numbers
  • rectangular
  • dials
  • logos

These Crosley radios are evidence of automobile styling’s influence on industrial design in postwar America. Here tuners and dials take inspiration from gleaming hubcaps, speakers stand in for automobile grilles, and the overall program recalls car headlights gently swelling out of their sleek and dynamic casing.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18643659/

  • molded plastic, metal
  • Gift of Barbara and Max Pine
  • communication
  • entertainment
  • industrial design
  • dials
  • white plastic
  • domestic interior
  • white pl

These Crosley radios are evidence of automobile styling’s influence on industrial design in postwar America. Here tuners and dials take inspiration from gleaming hubcaps, speakers stand in for automobile grilles, and the overall program recalls car headlights gently swelling out of their sleek and dynamic casing.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18643661/

  • molded plastic, metal
  • Gift of Barbara and Max Pine
  • communication
  • entertainment
  • industrial design
  • red plastic
  • domestic interior

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18646493/

  • graphite, brown, white, yellow color pencil on tracing paper
  • Gift of John Bruce
  • radios
  • cabinets
  • furniture design
  • domestic interior

This drawing, dated and marked with the Dreyfuss office stamp "Rough Sketch," is one of many designs completed by Dreyfuss’s office for RCA. Presenting the radio within a paneled wooden cabinet on four tapered legs suggests an attention to the decorative trends of mid-century furnishing and indicates the radio’s intended use in a domestic setting.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18648303/

  • graphite on off-white paper
  • Gift of Max and Barbara Pine
  • industrial design
  • radios
  • dials
  • domestic interior

The soft angles and highly polished surface evident in Mirza’s drawing of this rectangular radio demonstrate the application of streamlined design principles to industrial products. The sleek contours, emphasized through horizontal lines of shading on the top and face of the radio, brim with latent energy not unlike contemporaneous designs for cars and trains.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18648899/

  • injection molded polystyrene plastic, metal
  • Gift of Max and Barbara Pine
  • entertainment
  • music
  • information
  • radios
  • portable
  • listening

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18654035/

  • Designed by Henry Dreyfuss
  • Manufactured by Radio Corporation of America
  • molded plastic, cast gilt-metal, chrome
  • Gift of Anonymous Donor
  • communication
  • music
  • industrial design
  • radios
  • sunburst
  • dials
  • listening

Dreyfuss once observed that three million listeners tuned in to the NBC Symphony radio broadcast each week, concluding that, "The American people will listen to good music, if given the chance." The Sunburst’s straightforward, easy-to-use design presented that chance, expressing Dreyfuss’s life-long mission to elevate and democratize taste through well-designed, commercially accessible consumer goods.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18665097/

  • Manufactured by BayGen Power Company Ltd.
  • molded plastic, metal
  • Gift of Fran Smyth
  • entertainment
  • information
  • radios
  • portable
  • listening

In 1991 Baylis recognized the need for a way to communicate information to communities across Africa without access to electricity, batteries, or conventional radios. His solution was a hand-powered, wind-up radio. The Freeplay Radio evinces the importance of communication and design in a world where information empowers people to improve their lives and protect themselves.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18669479/

  • brush and dark brown ink, brown and white gouache, graphite, black crayon on tan paper
  • Gift of Alfons and Anita S. Bach
  • radios
  • presentation drawing
  • domestic interior

Streamlined designs were often realized in metallic chromes and shiny plastics, but this design renders a futuristically styled radio cabinet in steam-bent wood. Bach’s designs for home products and furnishings often repurposed elements to suit other products: the grill-like form concealing the radio’s speakers also appears in Bach’s designs for cylindrical containers and a scale.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18678417/

  • plastic, electronic components
  • Gift of Max Pine
  • communication
  • music
  • information
  • radios
  • portable

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18678419/

  • molded plastic, electronic components
  • Gift of Max Pine
  • communication
  • music
  • information
  • radios
  • portable
  • blue plastic

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18715171/

  • plastic, metal
  • Gift of Max Pine and Lois Mander
  • personal
  • rounded
  • entertainment
  • ovoid
  • minimalism
  • sleek
  • electronics
  • faces
  • white plastic

Starck and Olivet’s Moosk radio is heir to the trend toward biomorphic shapes that countered the rectilinear angularity typical of much of late-twentieth-century consumer electronics design. The abstracted face-like form emits sound from a perforated mouth, and the station display takes the form of a tiny "eye" at top.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18715173/

  • Manufactured by Matalie Crasset
  • molded plastic, metal
  • Gift of Max Pine and Lois Mander
  • communication
  • music
  • tool
  • radios
  • portable
  • conical

One of Crasset’s earliest works, the Sound Station takes its formal inspiration from the Golden Age of Radio with a speaker that recalls early gramophone horns. Here the designer has reduced the radio to a "functional and symbolic minimum" whose iconic, conical shape visually embodies the essential idea of sound.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18715185/

  • molded plastic, metal
  • Gift of Max Pine and Lois Mander
  • rounded
  • music
  • industrial design
  • radios
  • geometric
  • postmodern
  • sleek
  • abstract

This arc-shaped radio speaks to a 1980s design aesthetic that embraced geometric forms and sleek textured plastics, particularly in the burgeoning consumer electronics industry. Despite the radio’s high-tech appearance, the spherical AM/FM tuner is a completely analog interface, both obscuring and connecting users physically to the device’s inner workings.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18730099/

  • Designed by Apple Industrial Design Team
  • Manufactured by Apple Inc.
  • polished anodized aluminum, arsenic-free glass, molded polycarbonate resin
  • Gift of Apple
  • personal
  • entertainment
  • music
  • digital
  • minimalism
  • portable
  • innovative
  • extrude
  • orange plastic
  • monochromatic

Apple introduced the iPod, an all-white, personal music-player, in 2001, showcasing their now-iconic minimalist aesthetic. By 2009, the firm’s smaller iPod Nano was available in vibrant metallic colors. This shift reflects a change in the market for personal technology devices—a change that allowed for a greater range of choice and personalization.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18731145/

  • Designed by Whipsaw, Inc.
  • molded pc/abs plastic, elastomer, metal
  • Gift of Whipsaw
  • lighting
  • electricity
  • communication
  • utility
  • multipurpose
  • portable
  • handle
  • electronics
  • survival
  • dials
  • sound
  • red plastic
  • logos

Like the earlier Freeplay Radio, also on display, the FR 600 was designed as an emergency tool; it is powered by solar energy or a hand-crank. Taking inspiration from rugged automobiles like the Hummer and Landrover, its built-in utilities include an LED flashlight, walkie-talkie, siren, SOS beacon, and a USB charger, providing an all-in-one resource.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18801021/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette.
  • airplanes
  • scenic
  • portrait
  • radios
  • mural
  • globe
  • Radio City Music Hall

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/35456851/

  • Manufactured by Sony Corporation
  • molded plastic, stamped metal, stamped and pierced sheet metal, cord
  • Gift of Max Pine
  • personal
  • communication
  • music
  • minimalism
  • neutral colors
  • compact
  • innovative

Transistors revolutionized listening technology in the mid-twentieth century, replacing bulky vacuum tubes used in earlier radios and allowing for smaller devices that required less energy to power. One of Sony’s most successful products, the sleek, minimal TR-620 radio was small enough to fit into a purse or shirt pocket and came with a plug-in earpiece.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/35520917/

  • molded silicon rubber and abs plastic, electronic components
  • Gift of Max Pine
  • personal
  • communication
  • entertainment
  • information
  • brightly colored
  • minimalism
  • technology
  • geometric
  • portable
  • sleek
  • innovative
  • electronics
  • yellow plastic

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/404536631/

  • compression-molded plaskon, metal, glass, woven textile
  • Gift of George R. Kravis II
  • industrial design
  • fluted
  • cityscape
  • urban
  • skyscraper
  • ziggurat
  • stepped

During the Great Depression, Air-King turned to Van Doren and Rideout, members of the emergent industrial design profession, to create a product for a highly competitive market. Their design was inspired by the skyscraper—one of the era’s great icons—and utilized compression-molded plastic, a cheaper and less labor-intensive alternative to traditional wooden housings.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/404536639/

  • lithograph on paper
  • graphic design
  • electronics
  • commercial poster

For this advertisement for the Philips Miniwatt Type E444 diode-tetrode radio valve lamp, legendary graphic designer Cassandre used a rendering of the product as the focal point and created a striking typographic design, rendering the word "Miniwatt" in capital letters except for the two "i" characters. The design emphasizes the "mini" quality of the tube, which is rendered at a greater scale than life size.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/874397467/

  • gelatin silver print
  • Courtesy of Smithsonian Libraries 2000-42-1 ILV-018
  • architecture
  • interior design
  • art deco
  • radios

Bonney was a photojournalist and publicist living in Paris when she photographed the home of fashion designer Jacques Heim (French, 1899–1967). He chose to install his radio in the living room of his ultramodern Paris home. A large freestanding cone speaker and antenna rest on the cabinet containing the radio set.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/874397469/

  • gelatin silver print
  • Courtesy of Smithsonian Libraries 2000-42-1 ILM-012
  • architecture
  • interior design
  • art deco
  • radios

In this room, an oversized indoor loop radio antenna rests on the floor near the radio set. Early radios had bulky external components that many found unattractive—this may explain why the radio had a separate room in this fashionable Art Deco home of pianist Adèle Reifenberg.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/874397471/

  • Designed by Herbert Bayer
  • offset lithograph on paper
  • graphic design
  • typography
  • electronics
  • innovation

Bayer’s brochure for General Electric promoted FM radio and other forthcoming technologies of its electronics division. On the cover, photo-montaged hands hold a vacuum tube—an early electronic component that vastly improved the detection and amplification of radio signals. Decades of iterations and improvements to this basic technology led to the development of television, computer, and radar systems.

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721967/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • entertainment
  • performance
  • concert
  • Radio City Music Hall

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721969/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • entertainment
  • portrait
  • concert
  • globe
  • Radio City Music Hall

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721971/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • wreaths
  • broadcast
  • tombs
  • commemorate

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721973/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • broadcast
  • exploration
  • airplane

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721975/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • communication
  • broadcast
  • network

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721977/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • communication
  • transportation
  • ships

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721981/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • theatrical
  • performance
  • singing

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721983/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • broadcast
  • sports
  • sailboats
  • adventure
  • boxing

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721985/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • transportation
  • skyscrapers
  • innovation

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721987/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • sheet music
  • musical notation

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721989/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • broadcast
  • skyscrapers
  • Radio City Music Hall

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721991/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • radios
  • transmission
  • antenna

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721993/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • allegory
  • medieval
  • representational

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721995/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • allegory
  • medieval
  • representational

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108721999/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • allegory
  • medieval
  • representational

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108722001/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • allegory
  • medieval
  • representational

The World of Radio

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108722003/

  • cotton
  • Gift of Nicholas Meredith Turner in memory of Jessica Dragonette
  • allegory
  • microphone
  • radios