Snarkitecture (New York, New York, USA, founded 2008), manufactured by Calico Wallpaper (Brooklyn, New York, USA, founded 2013); Vinyl; Non-repeating custom print; Museum purchase

This object is currently on display in room 302 as part of The Senses: Design Beyond Vision. See our image rights statement.

 

See more objects with the tag landscape, winter, wallpaper, vinyl, torn paper.

Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

-0001

2018

0503, Topographies Wallpaper, 2017

Vinyl wallpaper is printed with high-resolution photographs of layers of torn white paper. To create the non-repeat pattern, the designers at Snarkitecture stacked reams of oversize cotton rag paper and tore each sheet by hand, exposing the fibers. The contours of the torn sheets resemble an excavated territory—a landscape discovered within the wall's surface. The design adds three-dimensionality and visual texture to a flat wall.

Snarkitecture (New York, New York, USA, founded 2008), manufactured by Calico Wallpaper (Brooklyn, New York, USA, founded 2013); Vinyl; Non-repeating custom print; Museum purchase
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This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition The Senses: Design Beyond Vision.

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1159162285/ |title=0503, Topographies Wallpaper, 2017 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=15 November 2018 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>