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Object Timeline

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1967

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Object ID #18457397

This is a Snuff box. We acquired it in 1967. Its medium is carved amethyst, chased gold, silver, cut diamonds, rubies, emeralds, turquoise, moonstone, platinum. It is a part of the Product Design and Decorative Arts department.

Snuff is smokeless tobacco made from finely ground leaves meant to be inhaled into the nasal cavity. Associated with the frivolity of the rococo era, snuff boxes typically came in two sizes, for pocket and for presentation. Tightly sealed to ensure that air did not penetrate the box, snuff boxes ranged from lavish materials for the rich to later simpler examples after increased accessibility of tobacco broadened snuff use. European taste for Turkish and Moorish fashion, visible in this snuff box, appeared as part of the exoticism of the mid-18th century.

This object was donated by Anonymous.

Cite this object as

Object ID #18457397; France; carved amethyst, chased gold, silver, cut diamonds, rubies, emeralds, turquoise, moonstone, platinum; 1967-48-19

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition The Virtue in Vice.

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18457397/ |title=Object ID #18457397 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=19 March 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>