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Object Timeline

-0001

1931

  • Work on this object began.

1969

  • We acquired this object.

2017

2020

  • You found it!

Object ID #18468291

This is a Vase. It was production directed by René Lalique. It is dated 1931 and we acquired it in 1969. Its medium is press-molded glass. It is a part of the Product Design and Decorative Arts department.

Lalique’s contributions to the 1925 exposition could be seen all over the grounds, most notably in a tall central fountain of glass that was lit at night, a motif picked up in a glass fountain that centered La Parfumerie, the fair’s perfume pavilion. In years following, the fountain remained a popular motif, evoked here in a series of graduated curls.

It is credited Gift of Jacques Jugeat.

Our curators have highlighted 4 objects that are related to this one. Here are three of them, selected at random:

  • Object ID #907130337
  • glass.
  • Lent by The Cleveland Museum of Art, Anonymous Gift, 2009.457.
  • 48.2016.10

Its dimensions are

H x W x D: 19.5 x 23.4 x 11.9 cm (7 11/16 x 9 3/16 x 4 11/16 in.)

It has the following markings

Incised under base along edge: "LALIQUE France"

Cite this object as

Object ID #18468291; Production directed by René Lalique (French, 1860–1945); France; press-molded glass; H x W x D: 19.5 x 23.4 x 11.9 cm (7 11/16 x 9 3/16 x 4 11/16 in.); Gift of Jacques Jugeat; 1969-126-6

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s.

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18468291/ |title=Object ID #18468291 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=29 September 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>