This object is currently on display in room 206 as part of Saturated: The Allure and Science of Color. There are 3 other images of this object. See our image rights statement.

 

See more objects with the tag ombre, color gradation, gradient, complementary colors.

See more objects with the color saddlebrown sienna rosybrown darkslategrey dimgrey or see all the colors for this object.

Object Timeline

1973

  • Work on this object began.

1977

  • We acquired this object.

2009

2012

2015

2018

2019

  • You found it!

Textile, Landis

This is a Textile. It was designed by Richard Landis. We acquired it in 1977. Its medium is linen, polyester and its technique is double cloth, each layer 2/2 twill. It is a part of the Textiles department.

Richard Landis, an artist-weaver known for his rigorous color studies, used six thread colors to create a spectrum of 21 shades, each of which appears systematically across the full range of graduated rectangles that form the “windows” in this upholstery fabric.

This object was featured in our Object of the Day series in a post titled A Team Effort.

Our curators have highlighted 4 objects that are related to this one. Here are three of them, selected at random:

Cite this object as

Textile, Landis; Designed by Richard Landis (American, b. 1931); Switzerland; linen, polyester; 1977-67-6

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition Saturated: The Allure and Science of Color.

This object may be subject to Copyright or other restrictions.

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18493167/ |title=Textile, Landis |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=26 March 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>