Object Timeline

1978

  • Work on this object began.

1979

  • Work on this object ended.

1991

  • We acquired this object.

2015

2020

  • You found it!

Poster, Cranbrook Architecture 1978/79, 1978–79

This is a Poster. It was designed by Katherine McCoy and featuring artwork by Daniel Libeskind and made for Cranbrook Academy of Art. It is dated 1978–79 and we acquired it in 1991. Its medium is offset lithograph on paper. It is a part of the Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design department.

This object was donated by Katherine McCoy. It is credited Gift of Katherine McCoy.

Its dimensions are

71.1 × 56 cm (28 × 22 1/16 in.)

It is signed

Printed in blue ink, vertically, lower right vertical margin: Design: Katherine McCoy Collage Drawings: Daniel Libeskind

It is inscribed

Printed in blue ink, upper right: Daniel Libeskind, Chairman / Department of Architecture / Roy Slade, President, CAA / A 2-year graduate Masters / of Architecture program, / structured on an indepen- / dent basis and directed / towards a design thesis. [adjacent to blue text on the right explaining the objectives of the program and contact information] Printed in red and blue ink, upper right: [names of the visiting guests in red, followed by the month they will teach, and their current position in blue]. Printed in red ink, directly below: Visiting Guests

Cite this object as

Poster, Cranbrook Architecture 1978/79, 1978–79; Designed by Katherine McCoy (American, b. 1945); USA; offset lithograph on paper; 71.1 × 56 cm (28 × 22 1/16 in.); Gift of Katherine McCoy; 1991-69-113

There are restrictions for re-using this image. For more information, visit the Smithsonian’s Terms of Use page.

For higher resolution or commercial use contact ArtResource.

If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18637181/ |title=Poster, Cranbrook Architecture 1978/79, 1978–79 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=18 February 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>