See more objects with the tag graphic design, film poster, promotional poster, hands, baby, storytelling.

See more objects with the color darkslategrey lightpink rosybrown chocolate dimgrey or see all the colors for this object.

Object Timeline

1984

  • Work on this object began.

2010

  • We acquired this object.

2012

2015

2020

  • You found it!

Poster, Dziecko Rosemary [Rosemary's Baby], 1984

This is a Poster. It is dated 1984 and we acquired it in 2010. Its medium is offset lithograph. It is a part of the Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design department.

Andrzej Pagowski’s illustration subtly depicts the premise behind director Roman Polanski’s psychological horror film. The poster only hints at what sinister events may occur: the blown-up image of a woman’s hand holding a small grotesque claw is hand-drawn, with expressive sketch lines, in bright colors with a bold outline. Much is left to the viewer to decipher. Polish posters do not often “advertise” what they depict (in a Western sense) and instead provide space for consumers to draw their own conclusions.

This object was featured in our Object of the Week series in a post titled Monster Hands.

This object was donated by Marc Benda. It is credited Gift of Sara and Marc Benda.

Its dimensions are

95.6 × 67.2 cm (37 5/8 × 26 7/16 in.)

Cite this object as

Poster, Dziecko Rosemary [Rosemary's Baby], 1984; Poland; offset lithograph; 95.6 × 67.2 cm (37 5/8 × 26 7/16 in.); Gift of Sara and Marc Benda; 2010-21-20

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition How Posters Work.

There are restrictions for re-using this image. For more information, visit the Smithsonian’s Terms of Use page.

For higher resolution or commercial use contact ArtResource.

If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18758243/ |title=Poster, Dziecko Rosemary [Rosemary's Baby], 1984 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=27 September 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>