See more objects with the tag mobility, urban planning, system, public space.

Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

2017

  • Work on this object began.

2018

2020

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Public Square, 2017

This is a Public Square. It was designed by FXCollaborative Architects and made for (as the client) Driverless Future Challenge. It is dated 2017.

Public Square reclaims road space as useful public space for pedestrians. A range of interlocking plug-and-play modules allows for a range of uses—from retail stands to gardens—enabling cities and communities to reimagine their streets and incrementally transform the city. Replacing just 5% of on-street parking in New York City would add the green space equivalent of one new Central Park. The modules reduce heat retention and storm-water runoff, which is critically important as cities face unprecedented storm events.

Model
2018
Acrylic, foam, foam board, paper

Floor and wall diagrams
2018
Digital prints

Video: Public Square
2018
3:06 minutes
Produced by FXCollaborative with Sam Schwartz Engineering and Mental Canvas
Courtesy of FXCollaborative

It is credited Courtesy of FXCollaborative.

  • GO OutdoorTable, 2017
  • powder-coated cast and extruded aluminum, powder-coated steel.
  • Courtesy of Landscape Forms.
  • MOBILITY.011

Our curators have highlighted 7 objects that are related to this one. Here are three of them, selected at random:

  • CityScope, 2018
  • aluminum, electronics, mirrors, acrylic, wood, plastic.
  • Courtesy of MIT Media Lab.
  • MOBILITY.037

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition The Road Ahead: Reimagining Mobility.

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318795865/ |title=Public Square, 2017 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=5 July 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>