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Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

2017

  • Work on this object began.

2019

Aguahoja II, 2017-2019

It was designed by Neri Oxman and manufactured by MIT Media Lab Mediated Matter Group. It is dated 2017-2019. Its medium is samples, structrure.

The Aguahoja project consists of biocomposite materials derived from shrimp shells and fallen leaves, which are augmented with natural pigments. The materials can be 3D printed and programmed to varied mechanical, optical, and olfactory properties. The structure demonstrates an architectural-scale iteration of the skin-and-shell composite. The artifacts illustrate continued research into the optical and mechanical properties of the biocomposites. The degraded samples illustrate the materials’ life cycle, ultimately returning to the ecosystem. Through life and programmed decomposition, shelter-becomes-organism, providing nutrients for “growing” buildings.

It is credited Courtesy of The Mediated Matter Group.

  • Box, 19th century
  • shaped tortoiseshell with silver inlay.
  • Gift of Sarah Cooper Hewitt.
  • 1899-12-1

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318798847/ |title=Aguahoja II, 2017-2019 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=16 December 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>