Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

2015

  • Work on this object began.

2016

2018

  • You found it!

Sample, Beaded Alphabet, F, 2015

This is a Sample, beaded alphabet. It was designed by Nikolai Haas, The Haas Sisters of Monkeybiz and The Haas Brothers and manufactured by Simon Haas.

This object is not part of the Cooper Hewitt's permanent collection. It was able to spend time at the museum on loan from The Haas Brothers and R & Company as part of Beauty—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial.

It is dated 2015. Its medium is acrylic beads, steel wire.

This beading sample demonstrates one of the beading patterns used to create the flowers in the Afreaks collection. The beads are assembled using hyperbolic geometric structures. Such patterns govern many natural phenomena, including as coral formations. The Haas Brothers created an “alphabet” of twenty-six beaded hyperbolic flowers that communicate these patterns to The Haas Sisters, who have not had access to formal math education.

It is credited Courtesy of R & Company, New York and The Haas Brothers, Los Angeles.

Our curators have highlighted 21 objects that are related to this one. Here are three of them, selected at random:

  • Purse, 1830–60
  • silk, glass beads, ivory.
  • Gift of Mrs. Albert Blum.
  • 1953-106-14

Its dimensions are

H x W: 15.2 × 10.2 cm (6 × 4 in.) (approx.)

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition Beauty—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial.

This image has a Copyright statement: © NSHAAS

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/404529339/ |title=Sample, Beaded Alphabet, F, 2015 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=18 September 2018 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>