This and 8 other objects are a part of a set whose first object is Tricorne and Streamline Tableware, 1934.

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Tricorne Plate, 1934

This is a plate. It was designed by Don Schreckengost and Frank H. Sebring Jr. and manufactured by Salem China Company. It is dated 1934 and we acquired it in 2016. Its medium is molded and glazed earthenware. It is a part of the Product Design and Decorative Arts department.

Don Schreckengost created the Tricorne ceramic tableware as a nineteen-year-old student with The Salem China Company. Tricorne was often sold alongside the Streamline shape. The Salem China Company partnered with Warner Brothers and hired movie stars to sit for publicity photographs taking tea with Tricorne and Streamline. These promotions, as well as Tricorne and Streamline’s modern color and pattern serve as reminders of the strategies that manufacturers enacted to maintain a profit during the Great Depression.

This object was donated by George R. Kravis II. It is credited Gift of George R. Kravis II.

Our curators have highlighted 1 object that are related to this one.

Its dimensions are

H x W x D: 2 × 18 × 18 cm (13/16 × 7 1/16 × 7 1/16 in.)

Cite this object as

Tricorne Plate, 1934; Designed by Donald Schreckengost and Frank H. Sebring Jr.; molded and glazed earthenware; H x W x D: 2 × 18 × 18 cm (13/16 × 7 1/16 × 7 1/16 in.); Gift of George R. Kravis II; 2016-5-2

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url= |title=Tricorne Plate, 1934 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=19 March 2018 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>

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