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Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

-0001

2019

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Book Illustration, Polychromatic Decoration as Applied to Buildings in the Mediæval Styles; Patterns for the Ornamentation of Pillars, plate XXII, 1882

This is a Book Illustration. It was written by William James Audsley and G. A. Audsley and published by Henry Sotheran Ltd.. It is dated 1882. Its medium is lithograph on paper. It is a part of the Smithsonian Libraries department.

Influential encyclopedias, such as Owen Jones’s The Grammar of Ornament (1856) and Auguste Racinet’s L'ornement polychrome (1869–73), inspired the publication of a series of colorful pattern books in the late 19th century. These works provided patterns that could be copied or adapted for decorative objects and buildings. Brothers William and George Audsley, Scottish architects who collaborated on books and architectural projects, created this book as a visual resource for the ornamentation of gothic revival buildings. This illustration depicts diaper, spiral, and zigzag designs—inspired by medieval patterns—for the ornamentation of pillars.

It is credited Collection of Smithsonian Institution Libraries.

Its dimensions are

H x W: 41.3 × 59.1 cm (16 1/4 × 23 1/4 in.)

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If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/68777353/ |title=Book Illustration, Polychromatic Decoration as Applied to Buildings in the Mediæval Styles; Patterns for the Ornamentation of Pillars, plate XXII, 1882 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=21 March 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>