This object has no known copyright, and as such we offer a high-resolution image of it. See our image rights statement.

 

See more objects with the color tan darkkhaki saddlebrown peru sandybrown or see all the colors for this object.

Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

-0001

2019

  • You found it!

Book Illustration, Les delices des yeux et de l'esprit, ou, Collection generale des differentes especes de coquillages que la mer renferme (The delights of the eyes and the spirit, or, general collection of the various species of shells found in the sea), vol. 1; Nautilus de papier, plate II., 1764–73

This is a Book Illustration. It was written by Georg Wolfgang Knorr and printed by Georg Wolfgang Knorr. It is dated 1764–73. Its medium is hand-colored engraving on paper. It is a part of the Smithsonian Libraries department.

Knorr worked as an engraver and naturalist in his hometown of Nuremburg, Germany. He became interested in the study of nature while illustrating such notable scientific books as Johann Jakob Scheuchzer’s Physica sacra (1731). Les delices des yeux et de l'esprit, published in six parts between 1764 and 1773, includes more than 100 hand-colored illustrations of shells. This engraving features the spiral shapes and distinctive linear quality of nautilus shells.

It is credited Collection of Smithsonian Institution Libraries.

This object has no known Copyright restrictions.

You are welcome to use this image in compliance with our terms of use.

For higher resolution or commercial use contact ArtResource.

If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/68777365/ |title=Book Illustration, Les delices des yeux et de l'esprit, ou, Collection generale des differentes especes de coquillages que la mer renferme (The delights of the eyes and the spirit, or, general collection of the various species of shells found in the sea), vol. 1; Nautilus de papier, plate II., 1764–73 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=16 February 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>