See more objects with the tag floral, black and white, vase, earthenware.

Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

1917

  • Work on this object began.

1927

  • Work on this object ended.

2017

2020

  • You found it!

Object ID #907130087

This is a Bell-form Vase with Black and White Decoration. It was designed by Michael Powolny and manufactured by Gmundner Keramik.

This object is not part of the Cooper Hewitt's permanent collection. It was able to spend time at the museum on loan from The Newark Museum as part of The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s.

It is dated ca. 1922. Its medium is molded white earthenware.

Michael Powolny’s ceramics exhibit patterns typical of those found in Wiener Werkstätte wallcoverings and textiles of the same date, but contrast with the lack of decoration seen in his glass bowl nearby. This vase was exhibited and acquired by the Newark Museum in 1923, but generally Powolny’s work was not known in the United States until later.

It is credited Collection of the Newark Museum, Purchase 1923, Gift of Otto Kahn, 1923.236.

  • Bowl (Austria), ca. 1914
  • mold blown, internally decorated white and overlaid opaline and applied black....
  • Gift of Daniel Morris and Denis Gallion.
  • 1993-134-8

Our curators have highlighted 1 object that are related to this one.

  • Pinocchio Vase, 2011
  • glazed molded and weighted hard-paste porcelain.
  • Neue Wiener Porzellanmanufaktur GmbH & Co KG.
  • 2011-48-1

Its dimensions are

H x diam.: 54.6 × 19.1 cm (21 1/2 × 7 1/2 in.)

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s.

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/907130087/ |title=Object ID #907130087 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=28 October 2020 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>