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Object Timeline

1939

  • We acquired this object.

2010

2015

2022

  • You found it!

Plate (USA)

This is a plate. It was decorated by Francis Lycett and Sidney T. Callowhill and manufactured by New York Faience Manufacturing Company. It is dated 1886–1890 and we acquired it in 1939. Its medium is glazed and gilt porcelain. It is a part of the Product Design and Decorative Arts department.

In the late 19th century the Greenpoint neighborhood of Brooklyn was home to at least a dozen major ceramics firms including the Faience Manufacturing Company. This plate exhibits two signatures of the firm’s production: raised gold paste decoration and a dark blue background. This piece’s octagonal form with a band along the rim and the attenuated floral decorations recall Japanese aesthetics.

This object was featured in our Object of the Week series in a post titled Nineteenth-Century Glitz in Greenpoint.

This object was donated by Mrs. C. R. Dumble. It is credited Gift of Mrs. C. R. Dumble.

Our curators have highlighted 1 object that are related to this one.

Its dimensions are

H x diam.: 2 x 22.3 cm (13/16 x 8 3/4 in.)

It has the following markings

On underside: "F. Lycett"

Cite this object as

Plate (USA); Manufactured by Faience Manufacturing Company (United States); glazed and gilt porcelain; H x diam.: 2 x 22.3 cm (13/16 x 8 3/4 in.); Gift of Mrs. C. R. Dumble; 1939-24-2

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18556541/ |title=Plate (USA) |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=2 December 2022 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>