Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/exhibitions/2318802212/

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

Contemporary Muslim Fashions is the first major museum exhibition to explore the rise of the modest fashion industry. Modest fashion refers to garments that are both highly fashionable and provide sufficient body cover to address cultural concerns for modesty. Many Muslim women and men dress modestly, in accordance with their faith, but individual and collective interpretations of modesty vary widely. In recent years, there has been increased awareness of Muslim consumers as an important segment of the global fashion industry, and increased visibility for designers and brands whose clothing responds to their needs. In some countries, such as Saudi Arabia and Iran, covering in the public sphere is regulated by law. Elsewhere it is a personal choice, informed by religious, cultural, and political concerns. Contemporary Muslim Fashions focuses on the intersection of regional dress styles, global fashion trends, and personal attitudes toward modesty. The exhibition does not aim to be a definitive survey but instead offers a current snapshot of Muslim women and fashion by spotlighting key themes and locations. Fashion can serve as a platform for self-expression and as a tool for positive social change. The exhibition examines how Muslim women—those who cover their heads and those who do not—have become arbiters of style within and beyond their communities. As designers and entrepreneurs, they have shown that clothing can be on-trend and still meet the needs of diverse wearers. As consumers, they have used their influence to shape global fashion markets. And as journalists, bloggers, and influencers, they have confronted a lack of representation in the mainstream fashion narrative and drawn international attention to the vitality of Muslim modest style. Contemporary Muslim Fashions is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. The Cooper Hewitt presentation of Contemporary Muslim Fashions is made possible by support from the August Heckscher Exhibition Fund. Additional support is provided by the Barbara and Morton Mandel Design Gallery Endowment Fund and Edward and Helen Hintz. Funding is also provided by the Cooper Hewitt Master's Program Fund.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797273/

  • screenprint on paper
  • Private collection

In January 2017, the social advocacy group Amplifier commissioned street artist Shepard Fairey to design a series of posters—We the People—in protest of president-elect Donald Trump. In his characteristic style, Fairey combined the first words of the United States Constitution with portraits of Native Americans, African Americans, Muslims, and Latinas. “We thought [they were the] groups that had been . . . criticized by Trump and maybe were going to be . . . feeling that their needs would be neglected in a Trump administration,” Fairey says.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797274/

  • Designed by Datin Haslinda Abdul Rahim
  • silk linen, silk gauze, rhinestones, paste stones
  • Courtesy of Modesty Is a Lifestyle by Blancheur

Blancheur offers women’s ready-to-wear garments and collections of telekung—prayer garments worn by Southeast Asian Muslim women. As designer Datin Haslinda Abdul Rahim explains, “We strive to create praying attire that allows the wearers to look their best in prayers and at other occasions without compromising their comfort.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797275/

  • Designed by Faiza Bouguessa
  • polyester crepe, satin, embossed faux leather, brass-plated buckle
  • Courtesy of Bouguessa

Unlike traditional abayas, Faiza Bouguessa’s designs are distinguished by their crisp lines and forms, which reflect her training in England as a tailor and patternmaker. Bouguessa remarks, “Though I design abayas and modest clothing . . . my designs could be worn by any type of woman anywhere in the world.” A version of this dress (left open to the thigh) was worn by the American singer Beyoncé.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797276/

  • Designed by Raşit Bağzibağlı
  • polyester crepe, polyester chiffon, polyester net, feathers, sequins

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797277/

  • Designed by Wadha Al Hajri
  • silk organza with cutwork and embroidery
  • Courtesy of Wadha Al Hajri (Wadha Haute Couture)

Wadha Al Hajri employs a team of skilled needle workers to create elaborate surface textures inspired by Islamic art and architecture. As she explains, “Art in particular is one of the strongest forms of cultural diplomacy.” In this abaya, embroidery and cut work mimic the intricate lattice screens known as a mashrabiya.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797278/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Alessia Gammarota

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797279/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Alessia Gammarota

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797280/

  • digital chromogenic print on paper
  • Courtesy of Boushra Almutawakel

In the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks in 2001, Boushra Almutawakel created an ongoing series that explores the many faces and facets of covering and, by consequence, of Muslim women. As she explains, “Islam and Muslims had taken international center stage. I found that we, as Arabs and Muslims, were either demonized or romanticized.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797281/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Alessia Gammarota/INSTITUTE

Several years ago, photographer Alessia Gammarota began to observe an increasing number of young Muslim women on the streets of London proudly wearing head coverings and modest attire. As she recalls, “I started questioning why my perception was different from the [mainstream] narrative of oppression associated with the Islamic veil.” Gammarota gradually developed the idea to “use stories about fashion to open up a dialogue amongst women” around issues of prejudice and discrimination.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797282/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Alessia Gammarota/INSTITUTE

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797283/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Hengameh Golestan and Archaeology of the Final Decade

Hengameh Golestan started photographing the day-to-day lives of women and children in her native Tehran as a teenager, but during the 1979 revolution she transitioned to documenting her country’s unrest. She captured these images “as documents of demonstrations of women against . . . the compulsory veiling of women . . . in all public spaces.” These protests continued for several days and attracted hundreds of thousands of women. The images have attracted renewed attention in the wake of current protests against the mandatory covering of women in Iran.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797284/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Hengameh Golestan and Archaeology of the Final Decade

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797285/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Hoda Katebi

In Iran, women are required by law to dress modestly and in government-approved colors. Despite the threat of punishments by the Gashte Ershad (morality police), a thriving underground fashion scene has emerged, which was captured by Iranian American blogger and activist Hoda Katebi in her self-published book Tehran Streetstyle.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797286/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Langston Hues

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797287/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Langston Hues

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797288/

  • video
  • Courtesy of Mona Haydar

To commemorate the first Muslim Women’s Day, an online campaign launched by the website MuslimGirl to celebrate the achievements of Muslim women, Syrian American poet and rapper Mona Haydar shared her first music video, “Hijabi.” The song’s verses address many of the probing questions often posed to women who cover, contributing to an ongoing dialogue about Muslim women’s dress. By appearing in the video eight months pregnant, Haydar also challenged conventional notions of motherhood.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797289/

  • archival pigment print on baryta paper
  • Courtesy of Rania Matar, Robert Klein Gallery, Boston, and Galerie Tanit, Beirut

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797290/

  • archival pigment print on baryta paper
  • Courtesy of Rania Matar, Robert Klein Gallery, Boston, and Galerie Tanit, Beirut

Rania Matar draws on her cross-cultural experiences as a Lebanese-born, United States–based photographer to explore issues of personal and collective identity. Matar explains, “My work . . . takes a contemporary look at women living in everyday circumstances and focuses on building visual, but also representational, associations between the portrayal of women in the United States and the Middle East, ultimately allowing women to identify with each other through common life experiences.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797293/

  • Designed by Alaa Balkhy
  • painted leather
  • Courtesy of Alaa Balkhy

New York-based designer Alaa Balkhy founded her collection, Fyunka, in response to her multinational lifestyle and her feeling of homesickness for her native Saudi Arabia when she was abroad. The illustrated characters on her designs are based on the ubiquitous gender identifiers found on the restroom doors throughout the Arabian Peninsula.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797294/

  • Designed by Céline Semaan Vernon
  • printed cotton and silk
  • Courtesy of Slow Factory

In 2017, Brooklyn-based fashion label Slow Factory partnered with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) to create a collection of garments that responded to President Donald Trump's immigration ban on several Muslim-majority countries. Using open data and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) satellite images, Vernon created a scarf with the word “Banned” across the night sky over the Middle East, where many of the prohibited countries are located.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797295/

  • Designed by Faiza Bouguessa
  • viscose, brass-plated eyelets, cotton
  • Courtesy of Bouguessa

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797297/

  • Designed by Faiza Bouguessa
  • polyester crepe, satin
  • Courtesy of Bouguessa

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797298/

  • Designed by Fahad Signature
  • Manufactured by Papillion Jewelry
  • silk, metallic embroidery, poyester satin, metal, rhinestones
  • Courtesy of Fatma Al Remaihi

Fatma Al Remaihi is CEO of the Doha Film Institute in Qatar, an incubator for Middle Eastern filmmakers. She wore this lavishly embroidered abaya to the 2018 Academy Awards, bringing a strikingly different ideal of beauty to the red carpet.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797299/

  • Designed by Hanan Ozair
  • wool blend twill, viscose, cotton
  • Courtesy of Pose/Arazzi

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797300/

  • Designed by Hanan Ozair
  • digitally printed crepe, cotton, and organza with boning
  • Courtesy of Pose/Arazzi

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797301/

  • Designed by Dolce & Gabbana
  • silk and lace
  • Courtesy of Her Highness Deena Aljuhani Abdulaziz

In 2016, luxury fashion house Dolce & Gabbana offered its first line of modest fashion, reflecting a larger trend of Western designers responding to the demands of Muslim consumers. The collection exclusively featured abayas, including this one, worn by Saudi businesswoman and former Vogue Arabia editor Her Highness Deena Aljuhani Abdulaziz.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797302/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Langston Hues

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797303/

  • Designed by Maha Abdul Rasheed
  • silk-wool blend
  • Courtesy of Bambah Modest

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797304/

  • Designed by Mariam Bin Mahfouz
  • silk organza
  • Courtesy of Haal Inc.

After studying architecture and graphic design, Mariam Bin Mahfouz founded Haal, which focuses on abayas with clean lines and sculptural forms. She is inspired by legendary couturiers Charles James and Cristóbal Balenciaga, whose volumes relied on clever construction, not ornamentation.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797305/

  • Designed by Mariam Bin Mahfouz
  • polyester and triacetate
  • Courtesy of Haal Inc.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797306/

  • Designed by Mashael Al Rajhi
  • merino wool, velvet

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797307/

  • Designed by Mashael Al Rajhi
  • merino wool, velvet
  • Courtesy of Mashael Alrajhi

Mashael Al Rajhi’s cutting-edge deconstructed looks blend traditional and contemporary elements. She comments, “Right now, if we’re looking for a more globalized view on fashion, we have to have representation from all its hemispheres. This is how we move forward; design should not be confined or boxed into restrictive mindsets.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797308/

  • Designed by Raşit Bağzibağlı
  • polyester chiffon
  • Courtesy of Raşit Bağzıbağlı x Modanisa

When Modanisa, one of modest fashion’s largest online retailers, commissioned Raşit Bağzıbağlı to design a limited-edition capsule collection for Dubai’s first-ever Modest Fashion Week in 2017, he traded his typically skin-baring gowns for dresses with long sleeves and skirts. He maintained his signature glamour by including lush patterns, lace, embroidery, and sequins.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797309/

  • Designed by Nora Aldamer
  • fulled wool, silk and lurex devoré velvet
  • Courtesy of Chador

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797310/

  • Designed by Rabia Zargarpur
  • combed cotton jersey, cotton

When Rabia Zargarpur started to cover in 2001, she experienced difficulty finding stylish modest garments. With her education and experience in fashion styling, she decided to create solutions, including the first jersey hijab. “I wanted to create something comfortable, breathable, and light—similar to the comfort of wearing a light T-shirt, but for the head.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797311/

  • Designed by Shadow Abaya
  • Manufactured by Shadow
  • silk crepe, silk chiffon, swarovski crystals
  • Courtesy of Meshaal Al Shatti & Partner Co.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797313/

  • Designed by Nour Kaiss
  • digitally printed rayon viscose
  • Courtesy of Reina Lewis

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797314/

  • Designed by Anandia Marina Putri Harahap
  • cotton twill, cotton, synthetic twill, cotton-blend knit, rubber

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797315/

  • Designed by Barjis Chohan
  • cotton, digitally printed silk crepe, polyester chiffon

Barjis Chohan’s faith guides her ethical and sustainable business practice, which includes fair wages, equal opportunities, the use of eco-friendly materials, and a stance against the objectification of men and women and distorted ideas of beauty. Her hand-painted and hand-drawn prints are the focus of the brand.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797316/

  • Designed by Barjis Chohan
  • digitally printed silk crepe and synthetic net

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797317/

  • Designed by Carmen W. Muhammad
  • ultrasuede, feathers
  • Courtesy of Carmen W. Muhammad

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797318/

  • Designed by Carmen W. Muhammad
  • wool, silk, faux fur
  • Courtesy of Carmen W. Muhammad

Carmen Muhammad began designing and making her own clothes at the age of fifteen, when she converted to the Nation of Islam. After decades of working in business, she launched her fashion company in the mid-1980s. Her designs are modernized versions of the tailored ensembles traditionally worn by women of the Nation of Islam.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797319/

  • Designed by Céline Semaan Vernon
  • screen-printed polyester and metal
  • Courtesy of Slow Factory

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797320/

  • Designed by Dian Pelangi
  • printed silk with metallic thread brocade (songket), painted wood and plastic beads, viscose

Dian Pelangi was one of six designers featured in the Indonesian Diversity show that was part of New York Fashion Week in 2017. Even while using traditional Indonesian textiles, her collection paid homage to the diversity and vibrant urban culture of New York City.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797321/

  • video

This video, originally set to the music of rapper Jay-Z, features stylish young Muslim women of diverse backgrounds reveling in an urban landscape on skateboards, in high heels, and in hijabs. The video sparked widespread discussion about what it meant to be an American Muslim woman. The term Mipsterz was coined by Rattani in 2012 and refers to young Muslims around the world who have evolving views on the intersections between religion, community, politics, culture, and Muslim identities.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797322/

  • Designed by Kuaybe Gider
  • printed cupro (cotton linter, cottonseed), silk
  • Courtesy of Kavin Textile Industry and Trade Joint-Stock Company

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797323/

  • Designed by Kuaybe Gider
  • polyester twill
  • Courtesy of Kavin Textile Industry and Trade Joint-Stock Company

For Muslim women in Turkey, the adoption of the trench coat as an element of modest fashion dates to the 1970s when the garment became a marker of the wearer’s modernity and urbanity. Here, Kuaybe Gider has reinterpreted the style by fashioning it from a soft, fluid fabric that gives a relaxed silhouette.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797324/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Langston Hues

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797325/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Langston Hues

In 2013, American photographer and musician Langston Hues began photographing modest fashion enthusiasts in his hometown of Detroit, Michigan. As his project to capture “the ever-growing, erupting culture of modest street style” gained followers, it grew organically, and people around the world began requesting that Hues visit their city to photograph them. Hues explains, “The genre of Muslim fashion has opened the door to ending stereotypes about Muslims . . . It’s humanizing and shows the diversity of their style. Modest style is a self-expression and comes in many colors and can be defined in many ways.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797326/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Langston Hues

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797327/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Langston Hues

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797328/

  • Designed by Naima Muhammad
  • printed ghanaian cotton and polyester blend, metal, plastic

Naima Muhammad first started using African wax-print fabrics after a trip to Ghana in 2013, when she received a piece of “Angelina,” a classic Vlisco print, print from her mother-in-law. In consideration of modesty, she combines the vivid patterns with high collars, long skirts, and wide-leg and parachute-style pants.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797329/

  • Designed by Nora Aldamer
  • crepe de chine
  • Courtesy of Chador

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797330/

  • Designed by Nzinga Knight
  • silk jersey
  • Courtesy of Nzinga Knight

In 2014, native New Yorker Nzinga Knight became the first hijabi contestant on the popular reality television show Project Runway. Knight created her own line of elegant and easy-to-wear modest clothing. Her Twareg dress “features hijab as an integral element of the garment as opposed to it being an afterthought or an accessory.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797331/

  • Designed by Shakeel's Boutique
  • silk, silk chiffon, metallic embroidery with metal coil, sequins, and glass beads
  • Courtesy of Saba Ali

San Franciscan modest stylist Saba Ali traveled to Pakistan to have her wedding ensemble made. She reveals, “My parents hail from India and Pakistan, lands of dazzling textiles and handwork. I was born [in the United States], but the dress of these countries is a big part of my connection to my background.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797332/

  • Designed by Saiqa Majeed
  • block-printed cotton, diamantes, sequins
  • Courtesy of Saiqa Majeed

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797333/

  • Designed by Saiqa Majeed
  • cotton, cotton-polyester blend, lace, net, sequins, pearl and glass beads, polyester satin
  • Courtesy of Saiqa Majeed

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797334/

  • Designed by Windri Widiesta Dhari
  • indigo-dyed cotton batik, cotton jersey
  • Courtesy of NurZahra and private collection of Mrs. Dade Stamboel (jacket) and Mrs. Astrid Sanjoto (pants)

At Tokyo Fashion Week in 2014, Windri Widiesta Dhari became one of the first designers to put models in hijabs on an international fashion runway. Her collection featured a dazzling array of batik fabrics, all designed by her and printed using organic dyes.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797335/

  • Designed by Hana Tajima
  • rayon, tencel, polyester, spandex, cotton, cupro

British-Japanese blogger and designer Hana Tajima’s designs for affordable fashion retailer Uniqlo reference dress styles from around the globe. Tajima says, “I like this idea that someone from a completely different background . . . could see a piece in the collection and think, I could really work that into what I want to wear.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797336/

  • Designed by Verona Collection
  • polyester
  • Private collection

In 2018, Macy’s introduced its first modest clothing line in collaboration with Verona Collection created by fashion photographer Lisa Vogl. Although the moderately priced maxi dresses, long tops, cardigans, and pants were made to accommodate Muslim concerns for modesty, they offered versatile and comfortable clothes for all women.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797337/

  • Designed by Renni Andriani
  • Manufactured by Rashawl x Motiprins
  • cotton piqué, cotton jersey, digitally printed cotton voile
  • Private collection

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797338/

  • Designed by Aheda Zanetti
  • polyester, spandex

Aheda Zanetti was early to the market for full-coverage swimwear, launching in 2004. She coined the term “burkini”—a combination of burqa and bikini—which quickly garnered the world’s positive and negative attention. When asked to respond to the 2016 efforts to ban the burkini in parts of France, Zanetti expressed shock that something that encourages sport and health is so controversial. She questioned, “This has given women freedom, and they want to take that freedom away?”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797339/

  • Designed by Rani Hatta
  • nylon, cotton
  • Courtesy of Rani Hatta Private Collection

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797340/

  • Designed by Rani Hatta
  • cotton twill, metal eyes, cotton braid, synthetic tulle
  • Courtesy of Rani Hatta Private Collection

Rani Hatta has carved out a unique place for herself by showing men and women on her runway in similar styles. While gender-neutral clothing has not typically been associated with modest dress, Hatta believes that the oversize fit of her designs can serve the needs of those who dress modestly and also erase gender stereotypes.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797341/

  • Designed by Rani Hatta
  • cotton knit, hand-woven cotton twill
  • Courtesy of Rani Hatta Private Collection

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797342/

  • Designed by Sarah Elenany
  • Manufactured by Elenany
  • digitally printed cotton jersey

Sarah Elenany was one of the earliest purveyors of modest streetwear for Muslim youth, creating long-sleeved hoodies printed with graffiti-style graphics. Her “Throw Yo’ Hands” pattern is formed by the shahada gesture—with one finger pointed upward to testify to the oneness of God—with raised fists and V signs, common symbols of unity, strength, and peace.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797343/

  • Designed by Shereen Sabet
  • polyester knit

In the early 2000s, several Muslim designers observed a lack of functional full-coverage swimwear on the market. In order to meet Muslim women’s standards of modesty, the swimwear needed to cover the head, legs, and arms, and not be form-fitting or clingy when wet—criteria that eliminated most commonly used swimwear fabrics. Research in materials, fit, and fabrication is making it possible for more women and girls to participate in water activities. In developing her full-coverage swimwear, Californian and long-time diver Shereen Sabet was inspired by surfer culture and her own dry suit. Her mix-and-match pieces are made from the same water-repellent fabric used in men’s board shorts, which does not cling when wet, allowing “Muslim women to comfortably and fully participate in water recreation with the rest of the crowd.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797344/

  • archival pigment print on paper

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797345/

  • archival pigment print on paper

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797346/

  • Designed by Sarah Elenany
  • digitally printed cotton jersey

In 2012, Sarah Elenany collaborated with the Scout Association to create a modest uniform for their 2,000 Muslim Scouts. With input from current members, Elenany designed long tops to wear over jeans or leggings, ensuring modesty during physical activities like rappelling and climbing. The resulting garments were popular with girls of all faiths.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797347/

  • Designed by Yasmin Sobeih
  • printed micromodal, tencel
  • Courtesy of UNDER-RÂPT

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797348/

  • Manufactured by Nike
  • polyester and spandex
  • Private collection

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797350/

  • Designed by Bernard Chandran
  • Manufactured by Bernard Chandran
  • four-ply silk, viscose knit, silk shantung, swarovski crystals
  • Courtesy of Bernard Chandran

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797351/

  • Designed by Bernard Chandran
  • pieced printed silk with cotton and lurex embroidery, swarovski crystals, silk batik
  • Courtesy of Bernard Chandran

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797352/

  • Designed by Bernard Chandran
  • pimai silk with embroidery, lurex and silk blend jersey
  • Courtesy of Bernard Chandran

Bernard Chandran, who is of Chinese and Indian heritage, draws upon Malaysia’s different cultures, fusing traditional and modern design influences. Chandran shows his collections in Paris, and also welcomes private clients to his showroom and works with them to choose fabrics and styles in order to create one-of-a-kind looks—a common practice in Malaysia.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797353/

  • Designed by Datin Haslinda Abdul Rahim
  • cotton blend with silk finishing and topstitching, viscose knit
  • Courtesy of Blancheur

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797354/

  • Designed by Dian Pelangi
  • machine-woven silk with metallic thread brocade, silk satin with metallic braid and embroidery, thai silk
  • Courtesy of Dian Pelangi

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797355/

  • Designed by Dian Pelangi
  • machine-woven silk with metallic thread brocade, silk organza, thai silk
  • Courtesy of Dian Pelangi

Dian Pelangi incorporates the textile traditions of both her paternal and maternal lineages into her designs. She was raised in her father's hometown of Pekalongan, Java, a center for batik (wax-resist dyeing). Her mother hails from Pelambang, Sumatra, the premier producer of exquisite gold-thread songket textiles. Pelangi uses machine-made rather than handmade songket in her designs. As she explains, “All [of] the emotions and feelings of the weavers [are] embodied . . . in every piece of songket . . . If someone wants to use the songket cloth as a shirt or dress, it means the cloth must be cut into pieces. This will change the story behind it and . . . disrespect the weaver.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797356/

  • Designed by Itang Yunasz
  • printed silk satin, net-covered jewels and silk fringe; printed silk chiffon; indigo-dyed cotton batik; indigo-dyed cotton; metal and synthetic pearls
  • Courtesy of Itang Yunasz

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797357/

  • Designed by Itang Yunasz
  • silk velvet, embroidery, silk satin, synthetic pearl buttons, printed silk crepe, spandex, cotton velvet, indigo-dyed cotton ikat
  • Courtesy of Itang Yunasz

In the early 2000s, almost twenty years after launching his fashion line, Itang Yunasz shifted his work to modest wear. He was inspired by his wife’s decision to cover at a time when there were very few options for fashionable modest dress. Yunasz has a deep knowledge and appreciation of his country’s rich textile heritage, which he both references and incorporates in his designs.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797358/

  • Designed by Itang Yunasz
  • printed silk satin, silk twill, embroidery, printed silk chiffon, indigo-dyed cotton ikat, cotton velvet, pearl and jewel beads
  • Courtesy of Itang Yunasz

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797359/

  • Designed by Khanaan Luqman Shamlan
  • silk, silk crepe batik with embroidered sequins and beads
  • Courtesy of Khanaan

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797360/

  • Designed by Khanaan Luqman Shamlan
  • silk batik embroidered with sequins and beads, synthetic satin, rayon grosgrain ribbon with synthetic net, beads, and jewels
  • Courtesy of Khanaan

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797361/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Langston Hues

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797362/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Langston Hues

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797363/

  • digital print on paper
  • Courtesy of Langston Hues

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797365/

  • Designed by Melinda Looi
  • Manufactured by Zahara Binti Ahmad Osman
  • silk chiffon batik, beadwork, crystals, lace, silk tassels, tulle, metal, pearls, leather
  • Courtesy of Melinda Looi

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797366/

  • Designed by Mohd Hafizi Radzi Woo
  • jacquard-woven and embossed silk with rhinestones and crystals, silk crinoline
  • Courtesy of FIZIWOO

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797367/

  • Designed by Mohd Hafizi Radzi Woo
  • jacquard-woven silk
  • Courtesy of FIZIWOO

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797368/

  • archival pigment print on paper

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797369/

  • digital c-type on board

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797370/

  • archival pigment print on paper

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797371/

  • archival pigment print on paper

Born in Iraq, photographer Wesaam Al-Badry and his family fled their home country for a Saudi Arabian refugee camp at the beginning of the Gulf War before relocating to Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1994. His work is often inspired by the disconnect he felt between his experiences in the Middle East and Middle America. In the series Al-Kouture, he refashions silk scarves by prominent European brands into niqabs. As he explains, “Al-Kouture . . . reveals the tension between . . . Western consumerism and its influence on the traditional Muslim culture. [It] plays with symbolism and the impact of globalization and explores the possibilities of assimilation in a vast polarized world.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797372/

  • archival pigment print on paper

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797373/

  • chromogenic print mounted to aluminum with luster laminate

In her work, Lalla Essaydi, who grew up in Morocco and Saudi Arabia and has lived in France and the United States, confronts traditional representations of Arab and Muslim women in the Western art canon. By showing actively engaged women, she decolonizes the artistic genre that casts them as passive objects of the male gaze.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797374/

  • chromogenic print mounted to aluminum with luster laminate

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797376/

  • chromogenic print on paper

Shadi Ghadirian’s Like EveryDay series was made in response to her then-impending marriage and explored her concerns about married life and the repetitive daily tasks she feared would come to define her identity. In each photograph, a female figure is draped in a colorful patterned chador of the type typically worn at home, and further obscured by objects that typify domestic duties.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797377/

  • chromogenic print on paper

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797378/

  • chromogenic print on paper

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797379/

  • metallic laser print on board

Hassan Hajjaj grew up in Morocco and moved to London when he was twelve. His Kesh Angels series, begun in 1998, “celebrates the colors and womanhood of Morocco . . . It turns around the stereotype that people may have of women in Muslim countries.” Their eclectically patterned outfits are of the artist’s creation, but the motorbikes are not. Hajjaj explains, “There’s not much public transport, and the streets are so narrow that it is, along with bicycles, the most convenient mode of transport [for] most Marrakeshi men and women.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797381/

  • Designed by Rebecca Alathoor
  • Manufactured by Della Reed
  • digitally printed silk-bonded neoprene, synthetic net, plastic sequins, pvc, acrylic
  • Courtesy of Rebecca Alathoor

For Rebecca Alathoor, pushing the boundaries of fashion design means using new technologies and unconventional materials, but also confronting social issues. As Alathoor expressed, “I thought it was significant to show that . . . a modest style of dress can still be fashion forward, conceptual, futuristic, but appropriate for all cultures to wear.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797382/

  • Designed by Oscar de la Renta
  • Manufactured by Kate Spade
  • silk with metallic embroidery
  • Courtesy of Sheikha Raya Al-Khalifa

The caftan is believed to have originated in ancient Mesopotamia. For centuries, it has been worn by the political and cultural elite, ranging from Ottoman sultans to former editor of Vogue Diana Vreeland in the 1960s. This caftan from Oscar de la Renta’s Ramadan Collection was worn by Sheikha Raya Al-Khalifa to an American embassy event in Qatar.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797383/

  • Manufactured by Marchesa
  • silk chiffon with silk and metallic embroidery, jewel cabochons, sequins
  • Courtesy of Sheikha Raya Al-Khalifa

This caftan from Marchesa’s Resort Collection was featured in a Qatar Special Edition of Harper’s Bazaar Arabia in 2012, modeled by entrepreneur and global style-setter Sheikha Raya Al-Khalifa. Dividing her time between Doha, Qatar, and Palm Beach, Florida, she says: “I’m always a fan of fashion doing cross-cultural relations.”

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797384/

  • Designed by Mary Katrantzou
  • silk, polyester

British fashion designer Mary Katrantzou first showcased modest fashions in Qatar in 2011 and now creates capsule collections for luxury e-retailer The Modist. The designers represented on The Modist are chosen without consideration of their religion or cultural heritage, but the modest market has proved attractive to Muslim and non-Muslim designers alike.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797385/

  • Manufactured by Peter Pilotto
  • silk, silk/polyester blend
  • Courtesy of The Modist on behalf of Peter Pilotto

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797386/

  • Designed by John Galliano
  • silk and silk tulle with silk and metallic embroidery, sequins, beads
  • Private collection

In the Najd and Riyadh regions of Saudi Arabia, weddings are multi-day events during which the bride wears several different outfits. This gown and the one next to it were custom made for special clients to celebrate tihwal, an event hosted by the groom’s family that commemorates the bride’s move to her husband’s home. Each gown is slim fitting with a flared hem, a signature silhouette for tihwal and one that is also popular for contemporary brides around the world.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797387/

  • Designed by Stéphane Rolland
  • Manufactured by Massaro
  • metallic lace, silk, metallic tulle, rhinestones, sequins
  • Private collection

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797388/

  • Designed by Pierpaolo Piccioli
  • moiré silk faille, silk faille, silk taffeta
  • Courtesy of Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser Al Missned, private collection

This pants ensemble differs from the version shown on the runway only in the addition of the three-quarter length sleeve. Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser Al Missned wore it to the Development Through Education Initiative at the New York Public Library, New York, in April 2018.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797389/

  • Designed by Bill Gaytten
  • silk gauze, net, pearl and glass beads, knit
  • Courtesy of Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser Al Missned, private collection

To create this elegant gown, the beaded top of one ensemble from Christian Dior’s Spring 2020 runway show was paired with the full pleated skirt of another. With sleeves added, it was worn by Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser Al Missned to an Italian state-visit banquet in Rome in 2012.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797390/

  • Designed by Jean Paul Gaultier
  • striped silk chiffon, sequins, glass stones, cabochons, seed bead embroidery and silk embroidery, silk knit
  • Courtesy of Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser Al Missned, private collection

This brilliantly colored ensemble was worn by Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser Al Missned to the opening ceremony of the 22nd Fez Festival of World Sacred Music in 2016. On the runway, the chartreuse robe was worn under a form-hugging, zip-front halter dress, here modified to a wide obi-style sash.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318797391/

  • Designed by Karl Lagerfeld
  • silk, net with bugle beads, glass beads, and sequins, rhinestones and metal clasps
  • Courtesy of Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser Al Missned, private collection

This dress was completely sheer when it appeared on the runway in Chanel’s Spring/Summer 2011 show. After having both pieces fully lined, Her Highness wore it to a gala dinner honoring the Emir of Qatar by the Spanish Royal Family at the Royal Palace in Madrid in 2011.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318798794/

  • digital print
  • Courtesy of Nike, Inc.

In 2017, Nike became the first global sports brand to enter the modest sportswear market with the release of its Pro Hijab. Designed in collaboration with Muslim athletes from the Middle East, the pull-on covering is made from a breathable lightweight polyester-blend fabric with an elongated back to prevent it from coming untucked during exercise.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318803424/

  • Designed by Mireia Lopez
  • s.café® nylon, pet recycled polyester, nylon, spandex
  • Courtesy of Haute Hijab Athletic Collection

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318803425/

  • Designed by Mireia Lopez
  • s.café® nylon, pet recycled polyester, nylon, spandex
  • Courtesy of Haute Hijab Athletic Collection

Launching in May 2020, Haute Hijab’s athletic collection will offer athletes multiple headcovering options, including the Ninja style with a closefitting neck, and the Two in One, a one-piece pull-on hijab with a drawstring at the nape to control its form and fit. All are made in a sustainably produced, naturally cooling fabric made from coffee grounds.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.

Contemporary Muslim Fashions

https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318803428/

  • Designed by Martha Moore
  • nylon lycra
  • Courtesy of Nike

Gill-inspired flaps covering open mesh areas in Nike’s Victory Swim allow the suit to shed water quickly. The design also features integrated hair management, a built-in sports bra, and close-fitting cuffs at the wrist and ankle to prevent sleeves and pant legs from riding up. The fabric provides a sun protection factor (SPF) of 40.

This object is currently on display in room 302 in Carnegie Mansion.