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Accessible Olli Shuttle, 2018

This is a Accessible Olli Shuttle. It was designed by Local Motors and collaborator: International Business Machines Corp. (IBM) and CTA Foundation. It is dated 2018.

Accessible Olli is an electric autonomous shuttle bus accessible to people with physical and cognitive disabilities. With a retractable wheelchair ramp, software that can process sign language, and displays that offer simplified information and reminders for individuals with memory loss, the shuttle offers new independence in movement for the 15% of the U.S. population living with a disability.

Vehicle Section
2018
Original design by Edgar Sarmiento3D-printed carbon fiber acrylonitrile butadiene styrene blend, vinyl

Each Olli vehicle is 3D-printed, allowing Local Motors to adjust digitally the design of an Olli file to suit the needs of individual clients.

Accessible Features
2018
Digital print

It is credited Courtesy of Local Motors by LMI.

  • VeloPlus Wheelchair Transport, 2016
  • steel frame with standard bicycle parts and components.
  • Courtesy of Bike-On/Spinov8 Distribution Center, Warwick, Rhode Island, USA.
  • MOBILITY.020

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318795896/ |title=Accessible Olli Shuttle, 2018 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=23 February 2019 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>