This object has not been digitized yet.

This object is currently on display in room 105 as part of Mr. Pergolesi's Curious Things.

 

Object Timeline

  • We acquired this object.

2022

Bound Volume, Designs for various ornaments : vases, figures, medallions, friezes, pilasters, and other ornaments in the Etruscan and grotesque styles, 1777–1801

This is a bound volume. It was print maker: Michel Angelo Pergolesi.

This object is not part of the Cooper Hewitt's permanent collection. It was able to spend time at the museum on loan from The Morgan Library & Museum as part of Mr. Pergolesi's Curious Things.

It is dated 1777–1801. Its medium is 70 plates, engravings on laid paper, bound in 3/4 black morocco, in black cloth box. It is a part of the department.

Pergolesi first advertised his ornament prints in June of 1777, alerting potential clients to his plan to publish them monthly: he promised to produce 12 sets of five prints each, for a total of 60 prints published over the course of a single year. Instead, Pergolesi would work on this project until his death in 1801, at which point he had published 67 prints. He dedicated the earliest prints to the Duke of Northumberland, his patron at Syon House in London. Pergolesi sold the prints from his shop in London’s Golden Square, the center of the Italian émigré community. Many collectors of these prints had them bound together, as in this example.

It is credited Morgan Library & Museum, New York. Gift of Henry S. Morgan, 1965.

Its dimensions are

Open in display position with spine flat to deck: 16.5 × 80 × 57.2 cm (6 1/2 × 31 1/2 × 22 1/2 in.)

If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/2318806817/ |title=Bound Volume, Designs for various ornaments : vases, figures, medallions, friezes, pilasters, and other ornaments in the Etruscan and grotesque styles, 1777–1801 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=7 December 2022 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>